#Revolt

 

3hyedof

Social media revolution, it’s definitely a thing and Id argue that there’s enough instances of its use to show that it works, but why is this the case?

Well the obvious major factor is the sheer number of people you can reach using social media. Looking at statistics from this year, every second people shared 100,000 tweets, almost 685,000 Facebook posts, 3,600 Instagram photos, and uploaded 48 hours of video onto YouTube.

With this amount of content being shared, the potential you have to reach huge numbers of people is unrivalled, and spreading awareness of the issue is the first step in creating revolution.

The next step is to actually get people to do something about it, and admittedly this is where the big weakness for using social media for revolution is found.  On social media people are quick to say they support something but slow to act on their statements.

For the thousands of slacktivists though there will be people that will actually take action and that’s all that really matters, throughout history small groups of people standing together for a cause have brought about huge change.

References:

http://designobserver.com/feature/malcolm-gladwell-is-wrong/19008/

Social Media Statistics

 

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2 thoughts on “#Revolt

  1. Clancy Carr

    It’s a tough gig, social media’ing as an activist. Much like the future of journalism, I think it relies on finding a niche and throwing yourself at it wholeheartedly. Having people act on those words is the hard part, of course. There needs to be a catalyst to actually do so is elusive, but one just has to look at the success of the ASL Ice Bucket Challenge to realize that, in order to raise ‘well over $100 million’, sometimes you just need a gimmick or eye-catching, unique idea:

    http://www.socialmediatoday.com/marketing/suzannewayincom/2015-10-07/social-media-activism-changing-world-one-post-time

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  2. t

    You have a really good point there regarding people quick to be supportive online but not physically act on it in real life. An example of how people are supportive on social media and acting upon it all at once is the #ItsOkayToTalk movement which promotes encouraging conversation about mental health and suicide within men specifically – people are able to simply upload a selfie to say they support it and make people aware that they are there to talk if needed.
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/entry/its-okay-to-talk-suicide-prevention-men_us_57c460d1e4b09cd22d919807

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